Tag Archives: Automation

AWS Glue Part 3: Automate Data Onboarding for Your AWS Data Lake

When it comes to building data lakes in AWS s3, it makes even more sense to use Spark. Why? Because you can take advantage of Glue and build ETL jobs that generate and execute Spark for you, server-less. It means you won’t need to worry about building and maintaining EMR clusters, scale them up and down based on when what job runs. Glue takes care of all of it for you.

AWW Glue

In part one and part two of my posts on AWS Glue, we saw how to create crawlers to catalogue our data and then how to develop ETL jobs to transform them. Here we’ll see how we can use Glue to automate onboarding new datasets into data lakes.

On-board New Data Sources Using Glue

On-boarding new data sources could be automated using Terraform and AWS Glue. By onbaording I mean have them traversed and catalogued, convert data to the types that are more efficient when queried by engines like Athena, and create tables for transferred data.

Below is the list of what needs to be implemented. Note that Terraform doesn’t fully support AWS Glue yet, so some steps needs to be implemented manually. See here for more information.

   1- Create s3 folder structure using Terraform (resource “aws_s3_bucket_object”). There are 2 folder structures that needs to be created:

       a- The structure that matches the pattern at which data lands, for example: s3://my_bucket/raw_data/data_source_name/table_name/. You can create multiple folders here, one per table that you’re onboarding.

      b- The structure to store data after it is transferred: s3://my_bucket/processed_data/data_source_name/table_name/.

   2- Create a new database for the source being on-boarded using Terraform. You can create this database in Glue (Terraform resource “aws_glue_catalog_database”) or in Athena (resource “aws_athena_database”). I couldn’t see any difference when I tried both options.

3- Create a new Crawler using Terraform for the new data source (Terraform doesn’t support Glue Crawlers yet, do this step manually until this issue is closed). This is the crawler responsible for inferring data structure of what’s landing in s3 and catalogue and create tables in Athena.

a- Crawler should point to the database related to the source. In example above, it should point to s3://my_bucket/raw_data/data_source_name/

b- Crawler will create one table per subfolder where it’s pointing to in s3, in Athena database (which will be used as source in ETL jobs later). In other words, we’ll need multiple folders in source folder in s3, but only one crawler in Glue.

c- Prefix table name to specify the table type, in this case raw e.g. “raw_”.

Note that tables created by this crawler are only for storing metadata. They won’t be used by users or data engineers to query data, we’ll create another set of tables for that in step 5.

4- Create new Glue ETL job using Terraform

a- Specify schedule according to the frequency at which data lands in s3

      b- ETL job will read the data in raw folder, convert it to Parquet (or any other columnar format like ORC), and store in Processed folder

   5- Create a new Crawler using Terraform to catalogue transformed data (again, you need to do this manually for now)

a- Schedule should match that of the ETL job in step 4. This is to make sure data processed and transformed by ETL is available for queries as soon as possible.

      b- It will create a table in Athena in the database where source table is

      c- Prefix table’s name: “processed_”

 

By following steps above, we have a self-evolving data on-boarding process that we can take from one environment to another in a matter of minutes. A very obvious use case would be to move from non-prod to prod after each source/table is tested and verified, just by pointing our Terraform scripts to the new environment.

Hope this post helps, and please do not hesitate to give me feedback via comments

 

 

 

 

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